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  • PCR & qPCR
    Real-Time Quantitative PCR
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    Leishmania-derived trimannose modulates inflammatory response to significantly reduce Leishmania (L.) major-induced lesions
    Tara L. Grinnage-Pulley, Infection and Immunity - 2017
    Abstract
    Leishmania lipophosphoglycan (LPG) is a key virulence factor, initiating inflammation resulting in cutaneous lesions. LPG is capped by various oligosaccharides. How these glycans are recognized and how they alter the course of Leishmania infection is poorly understood. Previous studies synthesized α-1,2-trimannose cap sugars on latex beads demonstrated that C57BL/6 mice co-inoculated with L. major and trimannose-coated beads produced significantly higher levels of IL-12 p40 and other pro-inflammatory, type 1 cytokines compared L. major infection alone within the first 48 h of infection. However, as L. major infection typically progress over weeks to months, the role of trimannose in altering disease progression over the course of infection was unknown. Wild-type mice were inoculated with either trimannose or carrier (uncoated) beads, infected with L. major alone, co-inoculated with carrier beads and L. major, or co-inoculated with trimannose beads and L. major. Trimannose treatment of L. major-infected mice decreased parasite load and significantly decreased lesion size at 14 days post infection (pi) compared to non-treated, infected mice. Infected, trimannose-treated mice had decreased IL-12p40 and IL-10 secretion and increased IFN-γ at 14 days pi. Mice lacking the ability to detect trimannose, mannose-receptor deleted mice (MR-/-), when treated with trimannose beads and infected with L. major did not have decreased lesion size. Leishmania-derived trimannose represents a novel immunomodulator that provides early type 1-skewed cytokine production to control parasite load and alter the course of cutaneous leishmaniasis.
    A comparative evaluation of crowding stress on muscle HSP90 and myostatin expression in salmonids
    Nicholas J. Galt, Aquaculture - 2017
    Abstract
    Stress is a major factor that contributes to poor production and animal welfare concerns in aquaculture. As such, a thorough understanding of mechanisms involved in the stress response is imperative to developing strategies to mitigate the negative side effects of stressors, including the impact of high stocking densities on growth. The purpose of this study was to determine how the muscle growth inhibitor, myostatin, and the stress-responsive gene HSP90 are regulated in response to crowding stress in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki), brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis), and Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). All species exhibited higher cortisol and glucose levels following the handling stress, indicating physiological response to the treatment. Additionally, all species, except rainbow trout, exhibited higher HSP90 levels in muscle after a 48h crowding stress. Crowding stress resulted in a decrease of myostatin-1a in brook trout white muscle but not red muscle, while, myostatin-1a and -2a levels increased in white muscle and myostatin-1b levels increased in red muscle in Atlantic salmon. In rainbow trout, no significant changes were detected in either muscle type, but myostatin-1a was upregulated in both white and red skeletal muscle in the closely related cutthroat trout. The variation in response to crowding suggests a complex and species-specific interaction between stress and the muscle gene regulation in these salmonids. Only Atlantic salmon and cutthroat trout exhibited increased muscle myostatin transcription, and also exhibited the largest increase in circulating glucose in response to crowding. These results suggest that species-specific farming practices should be carefully examined in order to optimize low stress culture conditions.
    T regulatory cell induced Foxp3 binds the IL2, IFNγ, and TNFα promoters in virus-specific CD8+ T cells from feline immunodeficiency virus infected cats.
    Yan Annie Wang, AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses - 2017
    Abstract
    Polyfunctional CD8+ T cells play a critical role in controlling viremia during AIDS lentiviral infections. However, for most HIV infected individuals, virus-specific CD8+ T cells exhibit loss of polyfunctionality including loss of IL2, TNFα, and IFNγ. Using the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) model for AIDS lentiviral persistence, our laboratory has demonstrated that FIV-activated Treg cells target CD8+ T cells, leading to a reduction in IL2 and IFNγ production. Further, we have demonstrated that Treg cells induce expression of the repressive transcription factor, Foxp3 in CD8+ T cells. Based upon these findings, we asked if Treg-induced Foxp3 could bind to the IL2, TNFα, and IFNγ promoter regions in virus-specific CD8+ T cells. Following coculture with autologous Treg cells, we demonstrated decreased mRNA levels of IL2 and IFNγ at weeks 4 and 8 post-infection and decreased TNFα at week 4 post infection in virus-specific CD8+ T cells. We also clearly demonstrated Treg cell induced Foxp3 expression in virus-specific CD8+ T cells at weeks 1, 4, and 8 post-infection. Finally, we documented Foxp3 binding to the IL2, TNFα and IFNγ promoters at 8 weeks and 6 months post-infection in virus-specific CD8+ T cells following Treg cell coculture. In summary, the results here clearly demonstrate that Foxp3 inhibits IL2, TNFα and IFNγ transcription by binding to their promoter regions in lentivirus-specific CD8+ T cells. We believe this is the first description of this process during the course of AIDS lentiviral infection.
    H3K27 Methylation Dynamics during CD4 T Cell Activation: Regulation of JAK/STAT and IL12RB2 Expression by JMJD3
    Sarah A. LaMere, The Journal of Immunology - 2017
    Abstract
    The changes to the epigenetic landscape in response to Ag during CD4 T cell activation have not been well characterized. Although CD4 T cell subsets have been mapped globally for numerous epigenetic marks, little has been done to study their dynamics early after activation. We have studied changes to promoter H3K27me3 during activation of human naive and memory CD4 T cells. Our results show that these changes occur relatively early (1 d) after activation of naive and memory cells and that demethylation is the predominant change to H3K27me3 at this time point, reinforcing high expression of target genes. Additionally, inhibition of the H3K27 demethylase JMJD3 in naive CD4 T cells demonstrates how critically important molecules required for T cell differentiation, such as JAK2 and IL12RB2, are regulated by H3K27me3. Our results show that H3K27me3 is a dynamic and important epigenetic modification during CD4 T cell activation and that JMJD3-driven H3K27 demethylation is critical for CD4 T cell function.
    Dietary broccoli impacts microbial community structure and attenuates chemically induced colitis in mice in an Ah receptor dependent manner
    Troy D. Hubbard, Journal of Functional Foods - 2017
    Abstract
    Consumption of broccoli mediates numerous chemo-protective benefits through the intake of phytochemicals, some of which modulate aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) activity. Whether AHR activation is a critical aspect of the therapeutic potential of dietary broccoli is not known. Here we administered isocaloric diets, with or without supplementation of whole broccoli (15% w/w), to congenic mice expressing the high-affinity Ahrb/b or low-affinity Ahrd/d alleles, for 24 days and examined the effects on AHR activity, intestinal microbial community structure, inflammatory status, and response to chemically induced colitis. Cecal microbial community structure and metabolic potential were segregated according to host dietary and AHR status. Dietary broccoli associated with heightened intestinal AHR activity, decreased microbial abundance of the family Erysipelotrichaceae, and attenuation of colitis. In summary, broccoli consumption elicited an enhanced response in ligand-sensitive Ahrb/b mice, demonstrating that in part the beneficial aspects of dietary broccoli upon intestinal health are associated with heightened AHR activity.
    Reptin regulates insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation in hepatocellular carcinoma via the regulation of SHP-1/PTPN6
    Anne-Aurélie Raymond, Cell Biochemistry and Function - 2017
    Abstract
    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the main primary cancer of the liver. Many studies have shown that insulin resistance is a risk factor for HCC. We previously discovered the overexpression and oncogenic role of the Reptin/RUVBL2 ATPase in HCC. Here, we found that Reptin silencing enhanced insulin sensitivity in 2 HCC cell lines, as shown by a large potentiation of insulin-induced AKT phosphorylation on Ser473 and Thr308, and of downstream signalling. Reptin silencing did not affect the tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor nor of IRS1, but it enhanced the tyrosine phosphorylation of the p85 subunit of PI3K. The expression of the SHP-1/PTPN6 phosphatase, which dephosphorylates p85, was reduced after Reptin depletion. Forced expression of SHP-1 restored a normal AKT phosphorylation after insulin treatment in cells where Reptin was silenced, demonstrating that the downregulation of SHP1 is mechanistically linked to increased Akt phosphorylation. In conclusion, we have uncovered a new function for Reptin in regulating insulin signalling in HCC cells via the regulation of SHP-1 expression. We suggest that the regulation of insulin sensitivity by Reptin contributes to its oncogenic action in the liver.
    Long-term correction of diabetic hyperglycemia through glucose-responsive hepatic insulin production using lentivirus
    Handorf Am, Journal of Diabetology and Endocrinolog - 2017
    Abstract
    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is caused by the autoimmune destruction of the insulin-producing β cells of the pancreas. Insulin gene therapy is a promising strategy capable of overcoming the limitations of current treatments, but to become a viable option, it must provide long-term, glucose-responsive control of insulin production. We have previously achieved glucose-responsivity by incorporating glucose-inducible response elements (GIREs) upstream of a liver-specific insulin expression cassette (3xGIRE.ALB.Ins1-2xfur). In this study, 3xGIRE.ALB.Ins1-2xfur was delivered into streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats using lentivirus, resulting in remission of diabetic hyperglycemia for at least 482 days while restoring rate of weight gain in a dose-dependent fashion. Insulin immunostaining showed abundant insulin production in the liver, and qPCR showed 13-20 lentiviral integrations per cell in the liver of rats treated with high dose lentivirus. Negligible integration was found in the pancreas, kidney, spleen and muscle of LV-treated rats, confirming liver specificity. In vitro, LV.3xGIRE.ALB.Ins1-2xfur produced a 4.5-fold increase in insulin production in high glucose conditions, and in vivo, a 1.7-fold increase in insulin levels was found during an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test. Unfortunately, limitations in large-scale lentivirus production and use of a tissue-specific promoter prevented treatment of more than one rat per batch of lentivirus. Thus, two of the LV-treated diabetic rats were undertreated, while another two rats were over treated, becoming hypoglycemic in the fed state. Nonetheless, we have established the framework for a long-term, glucose-responsive treatment for T1DM from which further improvements can be made.
    PMK-1 p38 MAPK promotes cadmium stress resistance, the expression of SKN-1/Nrf and DAF-16 target genes, and protein biosynthesis in Caenorhabditis elegans
    Alex Keshet, Molecular Genetics and Genomics - 2017
    Abstract
    The mechanisms of cadmium (Cd) resistance are complex and not sufficiently understood. The present study, therefore, aimed at assessing the roles of important components of stress-signaling pathways and of ABC transporters under severe Cd stress in Caenorhabditis elegans. Survival assays on mutant and control animals revealed a significant promotion of Cd resistance by the PMK-1 p38 MAP kinase, the transcription factor DAF-16/FoxO, and the ABC transporter MRP-1. Transcriptome profiling by RNA-Seq on wild type and a pmk-1 mutant under control and Cd stress conditions revealed, inter alia, a PMK-1-dependent promotion of gene expression for the translational machinery. PMK-1 also promoted the expression of target genes of the transcription factors SKN-1/Nrf and DAF-16 in Cd-stressed animals, which included genes for molecular chaperones or immune proteins. Gene expression studies by qRT-PCR confirmed the positive effects of PMK-1 on DAF-16 activity under Cd stress and revealed negative effects of DAF-16 on the expression of genes for MRP-1 and DAF-15/raptor. Additional studies on pmk-1 RNAi-treated wild type and mutant strains provided further information on the effects of PMK-1 on SKN-1 and DAF-16, which resulted in a model of these relationships. The results of this study demonstrate a central role of PMK-1 for the processing of cellular responses to abiotic and biotic stressors, with the promoting effects of PMK-1 on Cd resistance mostly mediated by the transcription factors SKN-1 and DAF-16.
    Numerical Relationships Between Archaeal and Bacterial amoA Genes Vary by Icelandic Andosol Classes
    Hendrikus J. Laanbroek, Microbial Ecology - 2017
    Abstract
    Bacterial amoA genes had not been detectable by qPCR in freshly sampled Icelandic Andosols thus far. Hence, a new primer set yielding shorter gene fragments has been designed to verify the absence of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in different Icelandic Andosol classes. At the same time, a new primer set was also constructed for archaeal amoA genes that should improve the quality of PCR products. Although a large part of the soil samples were found to be amoA-negative, bacterial amoA genes were detectable with new as well as old primer sets. The same results were obtained for the archaeal amoA genes. The relative distribution of archaeal and bacterial amoA genes varied between Andosol classes. Archaeal amoA genes were significantly more abundant in Brown than in Histic Andosols, while the opposite was observed for bacterial amoA genes. The numbers of archaeal and bacterial amoA genes in Gleyic Andosols were not significantly different from those in Histic and Brown Andosols. The numbers of bacterial amoA genes, but not the numbers of archaeal amoA genes, correlated significantly and positively with potential ammonia oxidation activities. The presence of the bacterial nitrification inhibitor allylthiourea inhibited the potential ammonia oxidation activities during the first 12 h of incubation. Hence, it was concluded that ammonia-oxidizing bacteria profited most from the conditions during the measurements of potential ammonia oxidation activities.
    Bioaccessibility, bioavailability and anti-inflammatory effects of anthocyanins from purple root vegetables using mono- and co-culture cell models
    Hua Zhang, Molecular Nutrition & Food Research - 2017
    Abstract
    Scope Immune-inflammatory, signalling and metabolic effects are the main pillars for bioactivity of anthocyanins derived from highly pigmented root vegetables. This study aims to assess the bioaccessibility and bioavailability of purple carrot and potato derived anthocyanins and the molecular mechanisms of their ability to ameliorate cellular inflammation in a mono- and co-culture cell models. Methods and Results An in vitro gastrointestinal model was used and demonstrated bioaccessibility of 44.62% and 71.8% for anthocyanins of purple carrot and potato, respectively. These accessible anthocyanins significantly inhibited cellular inflammation in Caco-2 cells. Intact cyanidin glycoside or petunidin glycoside (respectively from carrots and potatoes) were transported across a transmembrane cell model and detected by LC-MS/MS. Computational docking and glucose uptake analyses suggested uptake of anthocyanins was mediated by hexose transporters. Subsequent experiment using an inflamed Caco-2 BBe1/THP-1 co-culture cell model showed these transported anthocyanins inhibited IL-8 and TNF-α secretion, and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines by blocking NF-κB, and MAPK mediated inflammatory cellular signalling cascades, but with varying degrees due to structural features. Conclusion Anthocyanins from purple carrots and potatoes possess a promising anti-inflammatory effect in model gut system. They can be absorbed and act differently but are in general beneficial for inflammation-mediated diseases. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved
    Curcumin Protects Skin against UVB-Induced Cytotoxicity via the
    Maya Ben Yehuda Greenwald, Hindawi Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity - 2017
    Abstract
    Curcumin was found to be beneficial in treating several skin pathologies and diseases, providing antioxidant protection due to its reducing properties and its electrophilic properties (the ability to activate the Nrf2 pathway and induce phase II cytoprotective enzymes). Nevertheless, clinical applications of curcumin are being hampered by its insufficient solubility, chemical instability,and poor absorption, leading to low efficacy in preventing skin pathologies. These limitations can be overcome by using a nanotechnology-based delivery system. Here, we elucidated the possibility of using curcumin encapsulated in a microemulsion preserving its unique chemical structure. We also examined whether curcumin microemulsion would reduce UVB-induced toxicity in skin. A significant curcumin concentration was found in the human skin dermis following topical application of a curcumin microemulsion. Moreover, curcumin microemulsion enhanced the reduction of UV-induced cytotoxicity in epidermal cells, paving the way for other incorporated electrophiles in encapsulated form protecting skin against stress-related diseases.
    YY1 Is Required for Posttranscriptional Stability of SOX2 and OCT4 Proteins
    Mary C.Wallingford, Cellular Reprogramming - 2017
    Abstract
    Yinyang1 (YY1) participates in protein-DNA, protein-RNA, and protein–protein interactions and regulates developmental processes and disease mechanisms. YY1 interactions regulate a range of important biological functions, including oocyte maturation, epithelial to mesenchymal transition, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling. We tested the hypothesis that YY1 is required for inner cell mass (ICM) lineage commitment during preimplantation development. In this study, we document gene expression patterns and protein localization of key transcription factors in Yy1 global, tissue-specific, and dsRNA-mediated knockout/down embryos. YY1 protein was found in cells of preimplantation and peri-implantation embryos, and adult tissues where two isoforms are observed. In the absence of YY1, OCT4 and SOX2 protein were lost in the ICM during preimplantation and naive neuroectoderm during gastrulation stages, yet no difference in Oct4 or Sox2 mRNA levels was observed. The loss of OCT4 and SOX2 protein occurred specifically in cells that normally express both OCT4 and SOX2 protein. These observations support a role for YY1 meditating and/or regulating the interaction of OCT4 and SOX2 at a posttranscriptional level. Our results suggest that distinct mechanisms of YY1-mediated molecular regulation are present in the early embryo, and may offer insight to promote lineage commitment in in vitro cell lines.
    Increasing corn distillers solubles alters the liquid fraction of the ruminal microbiome
    J. C.McCann, Journal of Animal Science - 2017
    Abstract
    Five ruminally fistulated steers were used in a 5 × 5 Latin square design to determine the effects of increasing dietary fat and sulfur from condensed distiller’s solubles (CDS) on the ruminal microbiome. Treatments included a corn-based control (CON) and 4 levels of CDS (0, 10, 19, and 27%) in a coproduct-based (corn gluten feed and soybean hulls) diet. Fat concentrations were 1.79, 4.43, 6.80, and 8.91% for diets containing 0, 10, 19, and 27% CDS, respectively. Steers were fed for ad libitum intake once daily. After feeding each diet for 18 d, ruminal samples were collected 3 h after feeding on d 19. Samples were separated into solid and liquid fractions. Microbial DNA was extracted for bacterial analysis using paired-end sequencing of the V3 through V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene on the MiSeq Illumina platform and quantitative PCR of selected species. Orthogonal contrasts were used to determine linear and quadratic effects of CDS inclusion. Increasing CDS inclusion decreased (linear, P < 0.05) α-diversity and species richness in the liquid fraction. Analysis of Bray–Curtis similarity indicated a treatment effect (P = 0.01) in the liquid fraction. At the phyla level, relative abundance of Bacteroidetes decreased in steers fed increasing dietary inclusion of CDS as Firmicutes increased to 82% of sequences for the 27% CDS treatment. Family Ruminococcaceae increased (linear, P < 0.01) 2-fold in the liquid fraction when feeding CDS increased from 0 to 27% CDS, yet genera Ruminococcus tended (P = 0.09) to decrease in steers fed greater CDS. The most abundant family of sulfate-reducing bacteria, Desulfovibrionaceae, increased (P < 0.03) in the solid and liquid fraction in steers fed additional dietary CDS and sulfur. Relative abundance of family Veillonellaceae and Selenomonas ruminantium were increased (linear, P ≤ 0.02) in the solid fraction as steers were fed increasing CDS. There were no effects (P > 0.10) of feeding increasing dietary fat from CDS on fibroylytic genus Fibrobacter in either fraction. Results demonstrate increasing fat and sulfur from CDS in a coproduct-based diet markedly alters the liquid fraction ruminal microbiome but does not elicit negative effects on relative abundance of identified fiber-fermenting bacteria.
  • microRNA Profiling
    Leishmania-derived trimannose modulates inflammatory response to significantly reduce Leishmania (L.) major-induced lesions
    Tara L. Grinnage-Pulley, Infection and Immunity - 2017
    Abstract
    Leishmania lipophosphoglycan (LPG) is a key virulence factor, initiating inflammation resulting in cutaneous lesions. LPG is capped by various oligosaccharides. How these glycans are recognized and how they alter the course of Leishmania infection is poorly understood. Previous studies synthesized α-1,2-trimannose cap sugars on latex beads demonstrated that C57BL/6 mice co-inoculated with L. major and trimannose-coated beads produced significantly higher levels of IL-12 p40 and other pro-inflammatory, type 1 cytokines compared L. major infection alone within the first 48 h of infection. However, as L. major infection typically progress over weeks to months, the role of trimannose in altering disease progression over the course of infection was unknown. Wild-type mice were inoculated with either trimannose or carrier (uncoated) beads, infected with L. major alone, co-inoculated with carrier beads and L. major, or co-inoculated with trimannose beads and L. major. Trimannose treatment of L. major-infected mice decreased parasite load and significantly decreased lesion size at 14 days post infection (pi) compared to non-treated, infected mice. Infected, trimannose-treated mice had decreased IL-12p40 and IL-10 secretion and increased IFN-γ at 14 days pi. Mice lacking the ability to detect trimannose, mannose-receptor deleted mice (MR-/-), when treated with trimannose beads and infected with L. major did not have decreased lesion size. Leishmania-derived trimannose represents a novel immunomodulator that provides early type 1-skewed cytokine production to control parasite load and alter the course of cutaneous leishmaniasis.
    A comparative evaluation of crowding stress on muscle HSP90 and myostatin expression in salmonids
    Nicholas J. Galt, Aquaculture - 2017
    Abstract
    Stress is a major factor that contributes to poor production and animal welfare concerns in aquaculture. As such, a thorough understanding of mechanisms involved in the stress response is imperative to developing strategies to mitigate the negative side effects of stressors, including the impact of high stocking densities on growth. The purpose of this study was to determine how the muscle growth inhibitor, myostatin, and the stress-responsive gene HSP90 are regulated in response to crowding stress in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki), brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis), and Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). All species exhibited higher cortisol and glucose levels following the handling stress, indicating physiological response to the treatment. Additionally, all species, except rainbow trout, exhibited higher HSP90 levels in muscle after a 48h crowding stress. Crowding stress resulted in a decrease of myostatin-1a in brook trout white muscle but not red muscle, while, myostatin-1a and -2a levels increased in white muscle and myostatin-1b levels increased in red muscle in Atlantic salmon. In rainbow trout, no significant changes were detected in either muscle type, but myostatin-1a was upregulated in both white and red skeletal muscle in the closely related cutthroat trout. The variation in response to crowding suggests a complex and species-specific interaction between stress and the muscle gene regulation in these salmonids. Only Atlantic salmon and cutthroat trout exhibited increased muscle myostatin transcription, and also exhibited the largest increase in circulating glucose in response to crowding. These results suggest that species-specific farming practices should be carefully examined in order to optimize low stress culture conditions.
    T regulatory cell induced Foxp3 binds the IL2, IFNγ, and TNFα promoters in virus-specific CD8+ T cells from feline immunodeficiency virus infected cats.
    Yan Annie Wang, AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses - 2017
    Abstract
    Polyfunctional CD8+ T cells play a critical role in controlling viremia during AIDS lentiviral infections. However, for most HIV infected individuals, virus-specific CD8+ T cells exhibit loss of polyfunctionality including loss of IL2, TNFα, and IFNγ. Using the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) model for AIDS lentiviral persistence, our laboratory has demonstrated that FIV-activated Treg cells target CD8+ T cells, leading to a reduction in IL2 and IFNγ production. Further, we have demonstrated that Treg cells induce expression of the repressive transcription factor, Foxp3 in CD8+ T cells. Based upon these findings, we asked if Treg-induced Foxp3 could bind to the IL2, TNFα, and IFNγ promoter regions in virus-specific CD8+ T cells. Following coculture with autologous Treg cells, we demonstrated decreased mRNA levels of IL2 and IFNγ at weeks 4 and 8 post-infection and decreased TNFα at week 4 post infection in virus-specific CD8+ T cells. We also clearly demonstrated Treg cell induced Foxp3 expression in virus-specific CD8+ T cells at weeks 1, 4, and 8 post-infection. Finally, we documented Foxp3 binding to the IL2, TNFα and IFNγ promoters at 8 weeks and 6 months post-infection in virus-specific CD8+ T cells following Treg cell coculture. In summary, the results here clearly demonstrate that Foxp3 inhibits IL2, TNFα and IFNγ transcription by binding to their promoter regions in lentivirus-specific CD8+ T cells. We believe this is the first description of this process during the course of AIDS lentiviral infection.
    H3K27 Methylation Dynamics during CD4 T Cell Activation: Regulation of JAK/STAT and IL12RB2 Expression by JMJD3
    Sarah A. LaMere, The Journal of Immunology - 2017
    Abstract
    The changes to the epigenetic landscape in response to Ag during CD4 T cell activation have not been well characterized. Although CD4 T cell subsets have been mapped globally for numerous epigenetic marks, little has been done to study their dynamics early after activation. We have studied changes to promoter H3K27me3 during activation of human naive and memory CD4 T cells. Our results show that these changes occur relatively early (1 d) after activation of naive and memory cells and that demethylation is the predominant change to H3K27me3 at this time point, reinforcing high expression of target genes. Additionally, inhibition of the H3K27 demethylase JMJD3 in naive CD4 T cells demonstrates how critically important molecules required for T cell differentiation, such as JAK2 and IL12RB2, are regulated by H3K27me3. Our results show that H3K27me3 is a dynamic and important epigenetic modification during CD4 T cell activation and that JMJD3-driven H3K27 demethylation is critical for CD4 T cell function.
    Dietary broccoli impacts microbial community structure and attenuates chemically induced colitis in mice in an Ah receptor dependent manner
    Troy D. Hubbard, Journal of Functional Foods - 2017
    Abstract
    Consumption of broccoli mediates numerous chemo-protective benefits through the intake of phytochemicals, some of which modulate aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) activity. Whether AHR activation is a critical aspect of the therapeutic potential of dietary broccoli is not known. Here we administered isocaloric diets, with or without supplementation of whole broccoli (15% w/w), to congenic mice expressing the high-affinity Ahrb/b or low-affinity Ahrd/d alleles, for 24 days and examined the effects on AHR activity, intestinal microbial community structure, inflammatory status, and response to chemically induced colitis. Cecal microbial community structure and metabolic potential were segregated according to host dietary and AHR status. Dietary broccoli associated with heightened intestinal AHR activity, decreased microbial abundance of the family Erysipelotrichaceae, and attenuation of colitis. In summary, broccoli consumption elicited an enhanced response in ligand-sensitive Ahrb/b mice, demonstrating that in part the beneficial aspects of dietary broccoli upon intestinal health are associated with heightened AHR activity.
    Reptin regulates insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation in hepatocellular carcinoma via the regulation of SHP-1/PTPN6
    Anne-Aurélie Raymond, Cell Biochemistry and Function - 2017
    Abstract
    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the main primary cancer of the liver. Many studies have shown that insulin resistance is a risk factor for HCC. We previously discovered the overexpression and oncogenic role of the Reptin/RUVBL2 ATPase in HCC. Here, we found that Reptin silencing enhanced insulin sensitivity in 2 HCC cell lines, as shown by a large potentiation of insulin-induced AKT phosphorylation on Ser473 and Thr308, and of downstream signalling. Reptin silencing did not affect the tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor nor of IRS1, but it enhanced the tyrosine phosphorylation of the p85 subunit of PI3K. The expression of the SHP-1/PTPN6 phosphatase, which dephosphorylates p85, was reduced after Reptin depletion. Forced expression of SHP-1 restored a normal AKT phosphorylation after insulin treatment in cells where Reptin was silenced, demonstrating that the downregulation of SHP1 is mechanistically linked to increased Akt phosphorylation. In conclusion, we have uncovered a new function for Reptin in regulating insulin signalling in HCC cells via the regulation of SHP-1 expression. We suggest that the regulation of insulin sensitivity by Reptin contributes to its oncogenic action in the liver.
    Long-term correction of diabetic hyperglycemia through glucose-responsive hepatic insulin production using lentivirus
    Handorf Am, Journal of Diabetology and Endocrinolog - 2017
    Abstract
    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is caused by the autoimmune destruction of the insulin-producing β cells of the pancreas. Insulin gene therapy is a promising strategy capable of overcoming the limitations of current treatments, but to become a viable option, it must provide long-term, glucose-responsive control of insulin production. We have previously achieved glucose-responsivity by incorporating glucose-inducible response elements (GIREs) upstream of a liver-specific insulin expression cassette (3xGIRE.ALB.Ins1-2xfur). In this study, 3xGIRE.ALB.Ins1-2xfur was delivered into streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats using lentivirus, resulting in remission of diabetic hyperglycemia for at least 482 days while restoring rate of weight gain in a dose-dependent fashion. Insulin immunostaining showed abundant insulin production in the liver, and qPCR showed 13-20 lentiviral integrations per cell in the liver of rats treated with high dose lentivirus. Negligible integration was found in the pancreas, kidney, spleen and muscle of LV-treated rats, confirming liver specificity. In vitro, LV.3xGIRE.ALB.Ins1-2xfur produced a 4.5-fold increase in insulin production in high glucose conditions, and in vivo, a 1.7-fold increase in insulin levels was found during an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test. Unfortunately, limitations in large-scale lentivirus production and use of a tissue-specific promoter prevented treatment of more than one rat per batch of lentivirus. Thus, two of the LV-treated diabetic rats were undertreated, while another two rats were over treated, becoming hypoglycemic in the fed state. Nonetheless, we have established the framework for a long-term, glucose-responsive treatment for T1DM from which further improvements can be made.
    PMK-1 p38 MAPK promotes cadmium stress resistance, the expression of SKN-1/Nrf and DAF-16 target genes, and protein biosynthesis in Caenorhabditis elegans
    Alex Keshet, Molecular Genetics and Genomics - 2017
    Abstract
    The mechanisms of cadmium (Cd) resistance are complex and not sufficiently understood. The present study, therefore, aimed at assessing the roles of important components of stress-signaling pathways and of ABC transporters under severe Cd stress in Caenorhabditis elegans. Survival assays on mutant and control animals revealed a significant promotion of Cd resistance by the PMK-1 p38 MAP kinase, the transcription factor DAF-16/FoxO, and the ABC transporter MRP-1. Transcriptome profiling by RNA-Seq on wild type and a pmk-1 mutant under control and Cd stress conditions revealed, inter alia, a PMK-1-dependent promotion of gene expression for the translational machinery. PMK-1 also promoted the expression of target genes of the transcription factors SKN-1/Nrf and DAF-16 in Cd-stressed animals, which included genes for molecular chaperones or immune proteins. Gene expression studies by qRT-PCR confirmed the positive effects of PMK-1 on DAF-16 activity under Cd stress and revealed negative effects of DAF-16 on the expression of genes for MRP-1 and DAF-15/raptor. Additional studies on pmk-1 RNAi-treated wild type and mutant strains provided further information on the effects of PMK-1 on SKN-1 and DAF-16, which resulted in a model of these relationships. The results of this study demonstrate a central role of PMK-1 for the processing of cellular responses to abiotic and biotic stressors, with the promoting effects of PMK-1 on Cd resistance mostly mediated by the transcription factors SKN-1 and DAF-16.
    Numerical Relationships Between Archaeal and Bacterial amoA Genes Vary by Icelandic Andosol Classes
    Hendrikus J. Laanbroek, Microbial Ecology - 2017
    Abstract
    Bacterial amoA genes had not been detectable by qPCR in freshly sampled Icelandic Andosols thus far. Hence, a new primer set yielding shorter gene fragments has been designed to verify the absence of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in different Icelandic Andosol classes. At the same time, a new primer set was also constructed for archaeal amoA genes that should improve the quality of PCR products. Although a large part of the soil samples were found to be amoA-negative, bacterial amoA genes were detectable with new as well as old primer sets. The same results were obtained for the archaeal amoA genes. The relative distribution of archaeal and bacterial amoA genes varied between Andosol classes. Archaeal amoA genes were significantly more abundant in Brown than in Histic Andosols, while the opposite was observed for bacterial amoA genes. The numbers of archaeal and bacterial amoA genes in Gleyic Andosols were not significantly different from those in Histic and Brown Andosols. The numbers of bacterial amoA genes, but not the numbers of archaeal amoA genes, correlated significantly and positively with potential ammonia oxidation activities. The presence of the bacterial nitrification inhibitor allylthiourea inhibited the potential ammonia oxidation activities during the first 12 h of incubation. Hence, it was concluded that ammonia-oxidizing bacteria profited most from the conditions during the measurements of potential ammonia oxidation activities.
    Bioaccessibility, bioavailability and anti-inflammatory effects of anthocyanins from purple root vegetables using mono- and co-culture cell models
    Hua Zhang, Molecular Nutrition & Food Research - 2017
    Abstract
    Scope Immune-inflammatory, signalling and metabolic effects are the main pillars for bioactivity of anthocyanins derived from highly pigmented root vegetables. This study aims to assess the bioaccessibility and bioavailability of purple carrot and potato derived anthocyanins and the molecular mechanisms of their ability to ameliorate cellular inflammation in a mono- and co-culture cell models. Methods and Results An in vitro gastrointestinal model was used and demonstrated bioaccessibility of 44.62% and 71.8% for anthocyanins of purple carrot and potato, respectively. These accessible anthocyanins significantly inhibited cellular inflammation in Caco-2 cells. Intact cyanidin glycoside or petunidin glycoside (respectively from carrots and potatoes) were transported across a transmembrane cell model and detected by LC-MS/MS. Computational docking and glucose uptake analyses suggested uptake of anthocyanins was mediated by hexose transporters. Subsequent experiment using an inflamed Caco-2 BBe1/THP-1 co-culture cell model showed these transported anthocyanins inhibited IL-8 and TNF-α secretion, and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines by blocking NF-κB, and MAPK mediated inflammatory cellular signalling cascades, but with varying degrees due to structural features. Conclusion Anthocyanins from purple carrots and potatoes possess a promising anti-inflammatory effect in model gut system. They can be absorbed and act differently but are in general beneficial for inflammation-mediated diseases. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved
    Curcumin Protects Skin against UVB-Induced Cytotoxicity via the
    Maya Ben Yehuda Greenwald, Hindawi Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity - 2017
    Abstract
    Curcumin was found to be beneficial in treating several skin pathologies and diseases, providing antioxidant protection due to its reducing properties and its electrophilic properties (the ability to activate the Nrf2 pathway and induce phase II cytoprotective enzymes). Nevertheless, clinical applications of curcumin are being hampered by its insufficient solubility, chemical instability,and poor absorption, leading to low efficacy in preventing skin pathologies. These limitations can be overcome by using a nanotechnology-based delivery system. Here, we elucidated the possibility of using curcumin encapsulated in a microemulsion preserving its unique chemical structure. We also examined whether curcumin microemulsion would reduce UVB-induced toxicity in skin. A significant curcumin concentration was found in the human skin dermis following topical application of a curcumin microemulsion. Moreover, curcumin microemulsion enhanced the reduction of UV-induced cytotoxicity in epidermal cells, paving the way for other incorporated electrophiles in encapsulated form protecting skin against stress-related diseases.
    YY1 Is Required for Posttranscriptional Stability of SOX2 and OCT4 Proteins
    Mary C.Wallingford, Cellular Reprogramming - 2017
    Abstract
    Yinyang1 (YY1) participates in protein-DNA, protein-RNA, and protein–protein interactions and regulates developmental processes and disease mechanisms. YY1 interactions regulate a range of important biological functions, including oocyte maturation, epithelial to mesenchymal transition, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling. We tested the hypothesis that YY1 is required for inner cell mass (ICM) lineage commitment during preimplantation development. In this study, we document gene expression patterns and protein localization of key transcription factors in Yy1 global, tissue-specific, and dsRNA-mediated knockout/down embryos. YY1 protein was found in cells of preimplantation and peri-implantation embryos, and adult tissues where two isoforms are observed. In the absence of YY1, OCT4 and SOX2 protein were lost in the ICM during preimplantation and naive neuroectoderm during gastrulation stages, yet no difference in Oct4 or Sox2 mRNA levels was observed. The loss of OCT4 and SOX2 protein occurred specifically in cells that normally express both OCT4 and SOX2 protein. These observations support a role for YY1 meditating and/or regulating the interaction of OCT4 and SOX2 at a posttranscriptional level. Our results suggest that distinct mechanisms of YY1-mediated molecular regulation are present in the early embryo, and may offer insight to promote lineage commitment in in vitro cell lines.
    Increasing corn distillers solubles alters the liquid fraction of the ruminal microbiome
    J. C.McCann, Journal of Animal Science - 2017
    Abstract
    Five ruminally fistulated steers were used in a 5 × 5 Latin square design to determine the effects of increasing dietary fat and sulfur from condensed distiller’s solubles (CDS) on the ruminal microbiome. Treatments included a corn-based control (CON) and 4 levels of CDS (0, 10, 19, and 27%) in a coproduct-based (corn gluten feed and soybean hulls) diet. Fat concentrations were 1.79, 4.43, 6.80, and 8.91% for diets containing 0, 10, 19, and 27% CDS, respectively. Steers were fed for ad libitum intake once daily. After feeding each diet for 18 d, ruminal samples were collected 3 h after feeding on d 19. Samples were separated into solid and liquid fractions. Microbial DNA was extracted for bacterial analysis using paired-end sequencing of the V3 through V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene on the MiSeq Illumina platform and quantitative PCR of selected species. Orthogonal contrasts were used to determine linear and quadratic effects of CDS inclusion. Increasing CDS inclusion decreased (linear, P < 0.05) α-diversity and species richness in the liquid fraction. Analysis of Bray–Curtis similarity indicated a treatment effect (P = 0.01) in the liquid fraction. At the phyla level, relative abundance of Bacteroidetes decreased in steers fed increasing dietary inclusion of CDS as Firmicutes increased to 82% of sequences for the 27% CDS treatment. Family Ruminococcaceae increased (linear, P < 0.01) 2-fold in the liquid fraction when feeding CDS increased from 0 to 27% CDS, yet genera Ruminococcus tended (P = 0.09) to decrease in steers fed greater CDS. The most abundant family of sulfate-reducing bacteria, Desulfovibrionaceae, increased (P < 0.03) in the solid and liquid fraction in steers fed additional dietary CDS and sulfur. Relative abundance of family Veillonellaceae and Selenomonas ruminantium were increased (linear, P ≤ 0.02) in the solid fraction as steers were fed increasing CDS. There were no effects (P > 0.10) of feeding increasing dietary fat from CDS on fibroylytic genus Fibrobacter in either fraction. Results demonstrate increasing fat and sulfur from CDS in a coproduct-based diet markedly alters the liquid fraction ruminal microbiome but does not elicit negative effects on relative abundance of identified fiber-fermenting bacteria.
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